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Answers to the “Water Quiz”. how well did you do? let us know.

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Answers

1.  g) is the correct answer            According to the research of Dr. Batmanghelidj, author of You’re not Sick, You’re Thirsty, all of the items listed can be symptoms of dehydration.

2.  e) is the correct answer            None of the listed types of water are considered vital water. They are similar to processed food and are devoid of energy and life force. However, it is possible to return the life force to any contaminant-free water.

3.  c) is the correct answer            Water is a major source of energy for the human body. Daytime fatigue (and many other symptoms) can often be overcome by correcting chronic dehydration.

4. g) is the correct answer             Water is involved in every function in the human body. It is critical for healthy digestion and regular elimination, for the maintenance of cellular structure, for DNA integrity, and for the efficient removal of toxins and wastes.

5. f) is the correct answer              Water should be the first thing you consume in the morning after many hours of sleep. It is also necessary to prime the digestive organs; it should be taken at least 15 minutes before every meal.  Thirst is one of the later signs of dehydration. You should always drink water when you are thirsty. And you should even try drinking water when you are hungry since thirst is often mistaken for hunger.  Drinking water when you are hungry will often quell your appetite and stop many cravings.

6. c) is the correct answer             It is the salts (minerals) in water that conduct energy and that help water to convey signals in the human body. Water without salt is lifeless, just as salt without water is incapable of delivering its benefits. Water and salt* are perfect companions.

* Unprocessed, natural salt rather than the processed salt sold in grocery stores.

7. c) is the correct answer             Water does have structure—based on the formation of molecular tetrahedrons that join to create a repeating hexagonal symmetry. Water’s basic molecular structure incorporates both tetrahedral and hexagonal geometry.

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